This sentence has five words

For Reference Blog. Contains masterposts and resource guides for writing, drawing/art, and sometimes fandoms.

valentinedarling asked: What are your thoughts on the "cut what you love" idea?

maxkirin:

Hello there! (I love your hair ♥︎)

I assume you mean ‘cut what you love’ during the revision process, right? I prefer to call it ‘kill your darlings.’ In the past I have talked about editing (or chopping) out parts of the story that may not be effective— even if you like them, or enjoyed writing them. You can read more about my feelings, here c;

Instead, I want to spend this time to tackle the misconception of ‘cut what you love.’

It doesn’t mean what some people think it means.

Those of you who have seen my Top 5 Tips For Revision know that the overall message of that post was that (during the revision process) you must be able to look at your work objectively.

That is the exact same sentiment from which the advice ‘kill your darlings’ (or the misinterpreted ‘cut what you love’) comes from. The reality is that, from time to time, we end up writing things that may not be necessary, or effective, to the story.

I can already tell that someone is rolling their eyes at me, and that’s okay~ we can all have different opinions on this. What counts as ‘important’ and ‘not important’ is entirely subjective. I get that— but during the revision process you HAVE to be able to look at your writing and ask:

"Does this really need to be here? And if the answer is yes, am I choosing to keep this passage/paragraph/element because I believe the story is better because of it… or is it because I am attached to the time and effort I spent writing it?"

That’s it.

That is seriously the key to creating the best story possible: don’t waste the reader’s time with things that are not important to the story. This is also the secret for improving pacing. Again, I can feel that some of you may be taking my words wrongly, so let me clarify as to what I am NOT saying:

  • I am NOT saying that you have to dumb-down your story.
  • I am NOT saying that you have to sacrifice your artistic vision
  • I am NOT saying that you have to cut everything that you love

What is your job as a writer? To tell a compelling story.

Let’s say that again.

What is your job as a writer? To tell a compelling story.

Let me tell you about my first book. When I wrote the first draft of Ravensgem the opening was A LOT more different than it is now. It was a long, and epic retelling of the birth of Gadeen (the fantasy world where the story takes place). It was big, and expansive, and full of magical realism. I liked it. I loved writing it. But when I started editing the book that opening stood out like a sore thumb.

I didn’t want to chop out the entire opening of the book, I mean I nearly killed myself trying to get that first line right— you know? I didn’t want to just throw all of that work down the drain…

But that was exactly what I had to do.

I gave the book time. I let it sit. I came back and I looked at it objectively. I looked at it as though it had been written by someone else. I looked at the book as a whole, and I realized that opening had to go. Yeah, it was epic. Yeah it was fun to write— but Ravensgem was not about an epic fantasy world and the history that brought it to life. It was a story about people, about a young man choosing strife over safety and about a young woman choosing love over wealth.

I rewrote the opening into what it is today. I had fun. I enjoyed it. And I created something better than what was there before.

This is the entire point of revision.

Is it hard to chop out days (if not weeks) of ‘work’? Of course— but you need to remind yourself why you are doing all of this for:

To tell a compelling story.

I don’t know about you, but I want my stories to be awesome. I want my stories to be the best they could possibly be. And that sometimes means that you have to take out the entire opening of a book and start from scratch. Why? Why do all of this? Why go through all of this trouble? Because, at the end of the day, you are doing this… to tell a compelling story.

I hope this helps! If you, or any other writerly friend, has any more questions make sure to send them my way!

Keep Writing~ ♥︎

ttthhhooorrriiinnn:

elronds-eyebrows:

dragonriderofberk:

forficwritersbyficwriters:

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

You guys, this is such a great chart especially for budding writers. Sometimes it’s more effective to show a character being bored or excited or shocked without explicitly saying so.

Where had this been all my life?

This isn’t just useful for writing, this is an absolute lifesaver for people with Asperger’s syndrome and other disorders

I needed this.

(via godtie)

theroughcopy:

(… as directed by Michael Bay)

MYSTERY TOPIC???

Oh-ho, yeah, that’s right. You thought you had me figured out. But WHAM- unwelcomed and un-asked-for surprise. And you’ll never figure out what’s going on.

Until, like, now. 

Our last topic for this two week event is this: EVERYTHING.

Actually, it’s not my post. It’s a summary of a really, really helpful post Chuck Wendig did on his website Terrible Minds.

Let’s face facts: I’m not an expert. I’m not even published (besides fanfiction). The whole point of The Rough Copy is for me learn all this writing advice with you. It only feels fitting for me to step aside again, in this, most momentous of posts, and let a pro take the wheel.

CHUCK WENDIG’S 25 THINGS A GREAT CHARACTER NEEDS! (now cue the explosions, Mr. Bay)

1. A Personality - The character shouldn’t just be there, weathering the plot like a sailor. I want to fall in love with a person, not a cardboard standee.

2. Agency - The character actively makes decisions to affect their own future, trying to control their own destiny. Screw fate.

3. Motivation - Wants and needs that drive them to do stuff. Like plot stuff, maybe?? Who knows? … Wait, yeah, that.

4. Fear - ah, the most primal and powerful emotion. A character’s fear can affect the reader so much because the reader has fears. Maybe even the same ones. Can also help with numero 2.

5. Internal Conflict - hard choices- deep problems with near insurmountable solutions. This can be the most agonizing kind of conflict, because no matter how far they go, they will never escape themselves. 

6. External Conflict - external conflicts- with other characters, between different aspects of their lives- work best when matched up with internal conflicts

7. Connections to Other Characters - they don’t have to like it, but they have to have, you know, contact with someone at some point in their lives, Preferably, like, now.

8. Connections to Us, the Audiencereaders are narcissistic and will only care about your creative genius if they see themselves in your characters (young adult fiction has young adult characters? YOU’RE INSANE).

9. Nuance and Complexity - real people can’t be easily summed up or predicted.There’s layers, contradictions, and surprises!

10. Strengths - do their skillz pay the bills? Or do their internal skillz- heart integrity, passion- make such payments?

11. Flaws - the most interesting part! We’re all rotten at the core, right? Let’s show it!

12. A Voice - Your character needs a voice, y’all. They have to be identifiable by what they say, and how they say it

13. A Look - they gots to have style, darling! Even if it’s a crusty old man style. Helps with differentiating them from other characters

14. Emotions - They don’t have to be drama-queens.But the readers have to know these mythical emotions exist. They want to feel them, too, you feel?

15. Mysteries - Your characters don’t know everything; they’ve got as many questions as you do. For instance such classics as, what is life?  And, what even ever?

16. Secrets - Your characters know stuff. Like, stuff they wish they didn’t/ don’t want you to. I’m more likely to stick around to page 600 if I’ve got a question burning my insides.

17. THIS IS A FAMILY BOG YOU PERV, OH MY GOD

17. The Ability to Surprise - Doing surprising things, having surprising depths of emotion, or being surprisingly clever. *Michael Bay explodes more things* *no one is shocked*

18. Consistency - Here’s the tricky part: they have to be able to do things we wouldn’t expect, but feel like the same person, you know? 

19. Small Quirks - quirks aren’t a substitute for personality, they’re the seasoning on an already appetizing dish. Pizza. This is a metaphor to say I’m hungry. 

20. History - What did I tell ya? Your characters have existed long before the story started, and if it’s relevant, it can be super useful to relate what happened way back when to way back now.

21. The Right Name - You don’t need to spend hours on BabyNames.com looking for the right meaning. You should spend the time making sure it sounds right for the time and place. Also, avoid having Benni and Benny both live in your story. This stuff gets confusing.

22. Room to Grow - Even by the end of the story, they shouldn’t be perfect. They should have the capability to change (look at me throwing ‘shoulds’ at you like I’m some god dang writer Da Vinci) 

23. Livability - We don’t have to be besties with them or anything, but we do have to live with these people, in a sense, for four hundred pages. Hopefully, that idea is appealing.

24. Gravity - Wendig says they should be as big and interesting as possible. You know, not boring

25. You - You are an original .You are real. You are human. We readers like these things, and very much want them in your work. We want you, even if you don’t think we do.

(via harmonyinkpress)

hippoplatypus:

pigeonbits:

Color palette tutorial time!

This is by no means the Only Way To Pick Colors—it’s just a relatively-simple method I use sometimes.  I’ve found it works pretty well, almost regardless of what colors you pick—as long as you can keep them organized by those light/dark warm/cool categories, and make sure one category takes up a significantly higher proportion of page space, it usually turns out pretty good!

Also maybe seems like a nice way to figure out color schemes for themes/pages?

Writing Traumatic Injuries References

historicallyaccuratesteve:

alatar-and-pallando:

So, pretty frequently writers screw up when they write about injuries. People are clonked over the head, pass out for hours, and wake up with just a headache… Eragon breaks his wrist and it’s just fine within days… Wounds heal with nary a scar, ever…

I’m aiming to fix that.

Here are over 100 links covering just about every facet of traumatic injuries (physical, psychological, long-term), focusing mainly on burns, concussions, fractures, and lacerations. Now you can beat up your characters properly!

General resources

WebMD

Mayo Clinic first aid

Mayo Clinic diseases

First Aid

PubMed: The source for biomedical literature

Diagrams: Veins (towards heart), arteries (away from heart) bones, nervous system, brain

 

Burns

General overview: Includes degrees

Burn severity: Including how to estimate body area affected

Burn treatment: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degrees

Smoke inhalation

Smoke inhalation treatment

Chemical burns

Hot tar burns

Sunburns

 

Incisions and Lacerations

Essentials of skin laceration repair (including stitching techniques)

When to stitch (Journal article—Doctors apparently usually go by experience on this)

More about when to stitch (Simple guide for moms)

Basic wound treatment

Incision vs. laceration: Most of the time (including in medical literature) they’re used synonymously, but eh.

Types of lacerations: Page has links to some particularly graphic images—beware!

How to stop bleeding: 1, 2, 3

Puncture wounds: Including a bit about what sort of wounds are most likely to become infected

More about puncture wounds

Wound assessment: A huge amount of information, including what the color of the flesh indicates, different kinds of things that ooze from a wound, and so much more.

Home treatment of gunshot wound, also basics
More about gunshot wounds, including medical procedures

Tourniquet use: Controversy around it, latest research

Location pain chart: Originally intended for tattoo pain, but pretty accurate for cuts

General note: Deeper=more serious. Elevate wounded limb so that gravity draws blood towards heart. Scalp wounds also bleed a lot but tend to be superficial. If it’s dirty, risk infection. If it hits the digestive system and you don’t die immediately, infection’ll probably kill you. Don’t forget the possibility of tetanus! If a wound is positioned such that movement would cause the wound to gape open (i.e. horizontally across the knee) it’s harder to keep it closed and may take longer for it to heal.

 

Broken bones

Types of fractures

Setting a broken bone when no doctor is available

Healing time of common fractures

Broken wrists

Broken ankles/feet

Fractured vertebrae: Neck (1, 2), back

Types of casts

Splints

Fracture complications

Broken noses

Broken digits: Fingers and toes

General notes: If it’s a compound fracture (bone poking through) good luck fixing it on your own. If the bone is in multiple pieces, surgery is necessary to fix it—probably can’t reduce (“set”) it from the outside. Older people heal more slowly. It’s possible for bones to “heal” crooked and cause long-term problems and joint pain. Consider damage to nearby nerves, muscle, and blood vessels.

 

Concussions

General overview

Types of concussions 1, 2

Concussion complications

Mild Brain Injuries: The next step up from most severe type of concussion, Grade 3

Post-concussion syndrome

Second impact syndrome: When a second blow delivered before recovering from the initial concussion has catastrophic effects. Apparently rare.

Recovering from a concussion

Symptoms: Scroll about halfway down the page for the most severe symptoms

Whiplash

General notes: If you pass out, even for a few seconds, it’s serious. If you have multiple concussions over a lifetime, they will be progressively more serious. Symptoms can linger for a long time.




Character reaction:

Shock (general)

Physical shock: 1, 2

Fight-or-flight response: 1, 2

Long-term emotional trauma: 1 (Includes symptoms), 2

First aid for emotional trauma

 

Treatment (drugs)

WebMD painkiller guide

 

Treatment (herbs)

1, 2, 3, 4

 

Miscellany

Snake bites: No, you don’t suck the venom out or apply tourniquettes

Frostbite

Frostbite treatment

Severe frostbite treatment

When frostbite sets in: A handy chart for how long your characters have outside at various temperatures and wind speeds before they get frostbitten

First aid myths: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Includes the ones about buttering burns and putting snow on frostbite.

Poisons: Why inducing vomiting is a bad idea

Poisonous plants

Dislocations: Symptoms 1, 2; treatment. General notes: Repeated dislocations of same joint may lead to permanent tissue damage and may cause or be symptomatic of weakened ligaments. Docs recommend against trying to reduce (put back) dislocated joint on your own, though information about how to do it is easily found online.

Muscular strains

Joint sprain

Resuscitation after near-drowning: 1, 2

Current CPR practices: We don’t do mouth-to-mouth anymore.

The DSM IV, for all your mental illness needs.

 

Electrical shock

Human response to electrical shock: Includes handy-dandy voltage chart

Length of contact needed at different voltages to cause injury

Evaluation protocol for electric shock injury

Neurological complications

Electrical and lightning injury

Cardiac complications

Delayed effects and a good general summary

Acquired savant syndrome: Brain injuries (including a lightning strike) triggering development of amazing artistic and other abilities

 

Please don’t repost! You can find the original document (also created by me) here.

Not technically about Steve, but you know.

(via youlighttheskyfanfiction)

Reminders to myself (and any other artsy people who follow me i guess)

stardustmote:

-You don’t get better at drawing by avoiding drawing until you are better at drawing.

- You don’t have to make a new masterpiece every day it’s okay if all you drew is a doodle of a bug. You are now +1 bug doodle better at doodling bugs. 

- Also it’s okay if the thing you drew didn’t turn out very good. Everything you draw makes you one step closer to being able to draw good. You are still +1 step better at drawing whatever you drew no take backsies.

- You are the only person who knows if your art didn’t turn out as good as you wanted it to. You are the only person who can see the things in your art that weren’t what you imagined in your head. No one else will know unless you tell them.

- Comparing yourself to other artists just isn’t fair. You get to see all of your art, the best stuff and the worst stuff. You usually only get to see the best stuff other artists make. You don’t get to see that half drawn badly propotioned face they drew at 2 am and immediately scrapped. So don’t compare your badly drawn 2 am face to their best work.

- Just keep making art. The only way you can really fail is if you give up. 

(via tylerthelatteboy)

starrify-everything:

TIPS:
Tips For Characterization
21 Harsh But Eye-Opening Tips From Great Authors
The Importance Of Body Language
34 Writing Tips That Will Make You A Better Writer
Things Almost Every Author Needs To Research
Eight Short Story Tips
How To Stop Procrastinating
Ten Exercises In Creativity
How To Show (Not Tell)
Ten Ways To Avoid Writing Insecurity
Why Research Is Important In Writing
Five Ways To Get Out Your Comfort Zone
Seven Ways To Use Brain Science To Hook Readers And Reel Them In
The Difference Between Good And Bad Writers
Five Essential Story Ingredients
Formatting Your Manuscript
Four Ways To Have Confidence In Your Writing
99 Ways To Beat Writers Block
You’re Not Hemingway, Helping You Develop Your Own Skill
Best Apps For Writers
Online Whiteboard
This Sentence Has 5 Words
GRAMMAR (WORDS):
Urban Legends From The World Of Grammar
20 Common Grammar Mistakes
Synonyms For Said
Alternatives For But
Alternatives For Angry
Alternatives For Whispered
200 Words To Describe Light
45 Ways To Avoid Saying Very
Colour Names
Other Ways To Say…
Lay vs Lie
Make Words Longer
Words And Meanings
Common English Mistakes
Online Etymology Dictionary
Tip Of My Tongue
Cliche Finder
NAMES:
7 Rules Of Picking Names For Fictional Characters
Names In Different Time Periods
Behind The Name
Meaning Of Names
Fake Name Generator
Random Name Generator
Quick Name Generator
Fantasy Name Generator
Baby Names Country
Muslim Names And Meanings
Indian Names And Meanings
Name Playground
NOVEL:
How To Rewrite
Editing Recipe
How To Write A Novel
Writing 101: Revising Your Novel
Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written
Finishing Your Novel
Novel Outlining 101
Outline Your Novel In 30 Minutes
13 Most Common Errors On A Novels First Page
How To Organize And Develop Ideas For Your Novel
CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT:
Family Tree Maker
Tips For Characterization
Character Trait Masterlist
Character Bio Help
Character Writing Exercise
123 Ideas For Character Flaws
Three Ways To Avoid Lazy Character Description
How To Create Fictional Characters
Writing Magical Characters
Character Development Sheet
Character Development Worksheet
Character Chart
Character Chart For Fiction Writers
100 Character Development Questions For Writers
Ten Questions For Creating Believable Characters
Ten Days Of Character Building
Writing Effective Character Breakdowns
PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE and OUTLINE:
When To Change Paragraphs
36 (plus 1) Dramatic Situations
How To Write A Death Scene
The Snowflake Method
Effectively Outlining Your Plot
Tips For Creating A Compelling Plot
One Page Plotting
How To Create A Plot Outline In 8 Easy Steps
Choosing The Best Outline Method For You
Creating Conflict And Sustaining Suspense
Conflict Test
What Is Conflict?
Writing The Perfect Scene
How Can You Know What Belongs In Your Book?
SETTING, WORLDBUILDING AND FANTASY:
Masterpost For Writers Creating Their Own World
World Building 101
Creating A Believable World
Maps Workshop - Developing The Fictional World Through Mapping
Creating Fantasy And Science Fiction Worlds
Writing Fantasy
Myths
Creating The Perfect Setting
POINT OF VIEW:
Establishing The Right Point Of View
How To Write In Third Person
The I Problem
OTHERS:
Types Of Crying
Eye Colours
Skin Tones
Who Do I Write Like?
Write Rhymes
Survive Nature
How To Escape After Being Buried Alive In A Coffin

starrify-everything:

TIPS:

Tips For Characterization

21 Harsh But Eye-Opening Tips From Great Authors

The Importance Of Body Language

34 Writing Tips That Will Make You A Better Writer

Things Almost Every Author Needs To Research

Eight Short Story Tips

How To Stop Procrastinating

Ten Exercises In Creativity

How To Show (Not Tell)

Ten Ways To Avoid Writing Insecurity

Why Research Is Important In Writing

Five Ways To Get Out Your Comfort Zone

Seven Ways To Use Brain Science To Hook Readers And Reel Them In

The Difference Between Good And Bad Writers

Five Essential Story Ingredients

Formatting Your Manuscript

Four Ways To Have Confidence In Your Writing

99 Ways To Beat Writers Block

You’re Not Hemingway, Helping You Develop Your Own Skill

Best Apps For Writers

Online Whiteboard

This Sentence Has 5 Words

GRAMMAR (WORDS):

Urban Legends From The World Of Grammar

20 Common Grammar Mistakes

Synonyms For Said

Alternatives For But

Alternatives For Angry

Alternatives For Whispered

200 Words To Describe Light

45 Ways To Avoid Saying Very

Colour Names

Other Ways To Say…

Lay vs Lie

Make Words Longer

Words And Meanings

Common English Mistakes

Online Etymology Dictionary

Tip Of My Tongue

Cliche Finder

NAMES:

7 Rules Of Picking Names For Fictional Characters

Names In Different Time Periods

Behind The Name

Meaning Of Names

Fake Name Generator

Random Name Generator

Quick Name Generator

Fantasy Name Generator

Baby Names Country

Muslim Names And Meanings

Indian Names And Meanings

Name Playground

NOVEL:

How To Rewrite

Editing Recipe

How To Write A Novel

Writing 101: Revising Your Novel

Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written

Finishing Your Novel

Novel Outlining 101

Outline Your Novel In 30 Minutes

13 Most Common Errors On A Novels First Page

How To Organize And Develop Ideas For Your Novel

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT:

Family Tree Maker

Tips For Characterization

Character Trait Masterlist

Character Bio Help

Character Writing Exercise

123 Ideas For Character Flaws

Three Ways To Avoid Lazy Character Description

How To Create Fictional Characters

Writing Magical Characters

Character Development Sheet

Character Development Worksheet

Character Chart

Character Chart For Fiction Writers

100 Character Development Questions For Writers

Ten Questions For Creating Believable Characters

Ten Days Of Character Building

Writing Effective Character Breakdowns

PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE and OUTLINE:

When To Change Paragraphs

36 (plus 1) Dramatic Situations

How To Write A Death Scene

The Snowflake Method

Effectively Outlining Your Plot

Tips For Creating A Compelling Plot

One Page Plotting

How To Create A Plot Outline In 8 Easy Steps

Choosing The Best Outline Method For You

Creating Conflict And Sustaining Suspense

Conflict Test

What Is Conflict?

Writing The Perfect Scene

How Can You Know What Belongs In Your Book?

SETTING, WORLDBUILDING AND FANTASY:

Masterpost For Writers Creating Their Own World

World Building 101

Creating A Believable World

Maps Workshop - Developing The Fictional World Through Mapping

Creating Fantasy And Science Fiction Worlds

Writing Fantasy

Myths

Creating The Perfect Setting

POINT OF VIEW:

Establishing The Right Point Of View

How To Write In Third Person

The I Problem

OTHERS:

Types Of Crying

Eye Colours

Skin Tones

Who Do I Write Like?

Write Rhymes

Survive Nature

How To Escape After Being Buried Alive In A Coffin

(via bastdazbog)

Anonymous asked: do you know where i can read the winter soldier comics?

weinersoldier:

Digitally here

In trade paperbacks as The Longest Winter, Broken Arrow, Black Widow Hunt, and The Electric Ghost

There is only one volume of Winter Soldier, the first 14 issues are collected in the first three trades and written by Ed Brubaker, and the final 5 issues are collected in the last trade and written by Jason Latour.